Bucher's Broom Root - Cut Organic

Herbs: Butcher's Broom Root - Cut, Organic

Common Name: Butcher's broom
Latin Name: Ruscus aculeatus
Origin: Croatia

Excerpts from Nutritional Herbology

Its medicinal applications involve the use of the root (rhizome), which has been found by ancient peoples and modern medicine alike to be one of nature’s most potent remedies for a wide spectrum of circulatory ailments ranging from thrombosis and phlebitis to varicose veins and hemorrhoids.

Theophrastus (c. 325 B.C.) the Greek naturalist and philosopher, praised the healing powers of Ruscus aculeatus (butcher’s broom). He reported seeing “lame people get up and walk” and “swelling become normal again after treatment” with what he called “the miracle herb.”

Pliny (c. 60 A.D.), the Roman scholar who wrote many treatises on the healing properties of herbs, described swellings (varicose veins) that “became flat again after patients took the powdered root of the whisk-broom plant.”

Dioscorides recommended butcher’s broom as an aperient (appetite stimulant) and diuretic.

During the Middle Ages, it was used as a food and gained a reputation for its power to relieve “a heavy feeling in the legs.”

The vasoconstricting effect makes it useful in reducing varicose veins and hemorrhoids. Its ability to decrease capillary permeability provides an anti-inflammatory effect. Heavy legs and swelling associated with menstruation, pregnancy and long-term standing can produce pools of lymphatic fluid that can be affected by butcher’s broom.

Butcher’s broom is an excellent herbal source of iron and silicon.

From Our Reading and/or Experience...

  • We use Butcher's Broom often in tea and tincture combinations. Of course, it can be used in many other types of remedies.
  • It can be used to benefit anyone: men, women (including before, during or after pregnancy, and nursing), children and animals.
  • It can be used as often as you would like, and in any way you choose.
  • As is the case with most herbs, Butcher's Broom should be stored in a dark, dry, and cool place.

Customer Reviews

Please, take a moment and comment on this product.

Root or power for tincture
by Angela on Aug 27, 2013

Hello. I'm wanting to make a tincture with butchers broom and rosemary. Would it be better to use the root cut or as a powder or doesn't it really matter? Thank you for your help.

    Re: Root or power for tincture
    by Bulk Herb Store on Aug 27, 2013

    It is better to use the root cut. Powders don't work as well in a tincture. Thanks!


From our Mailbox

Thank you! Thank you! I placed my order on Wednesday and it was here Saturday. I had been out of my favorite tea, Rise and Shine, for a little while and really missed it. I just love this tea. I have yet to kick the coffee habit, but after a cup or two of coffee in the morning I make a pot of Rise and Shine right in my coffee pot. I drink it through out the day and make another smaller pot in the evening, using the same tea leaves for my husband and I to enjoy after dinner. I even make an altered version of the tea for my children. I leave out the Ginkgo and Bilberry and add Cinnamon and sweeten with raw honey. They call it cinnamon tea. I call it Rise and Shine for kids. Even my two year old asks for tea in her sippy cup. And whenever they've been exposed to an illness, I just add a spoonful of Echinacea to the pot. In warmer weather I make the pot the same but allow it to cool to make iced tea. Thank you for sharing this wonderful tea.


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