Ginger Root - Powder, Organic

Herbs: Ginger Root - Powder, Organically Grown

Common Names: Ginger, snake root
Latin Name: Zingiber officinale
Origin: India

Excerpts from Left for Dead

Ginger has been used in Chinese medicine for over 2,000 years as a remedy for digestive disorders, nausea, fever, coughing, diarrhea, rheumatism and lumbago.

Hong Kong boat dwellers chew it for motion sickness.

Much of the research done on the plant’s antinausea properties concentrated on treatment of motion sickness because those experiments were easiest to control.

Unlike Dramamine, which contains the drug dimenhydrinate, ginger does not have the side effect of drowsiness because it works on the stomach, not the brain.

Ginger root proved to be an effective motion sickness antidote for travel by car, boat, train or plane.

Ginger has been clinically proven to decrease the nausea, vomiting and diarrhea associated with the common three-day and 24-hour flu viruses. Taken early enough, ginger can help thwart the flu entirely, according to Mowrey.

Ginger tea with honey and lemon is the folk medicine prescription for indigestion, cramps, nausea, colds and flu. The tea is made by grating one ounce of fresh or dried ginger root into a pint of water and simmering for 10 minutes.

To make a fomentation for treating external aches, pains and inflammations, simmer five ounces of grated ginger in two quarts of water for 10 minutes. Apply the fomentation to the affected area with a cloth and re-apply to keep it warm. Reddening skin indicates increased circulation.

A massage oil for muscle pain or dandruff can be made by combining the juice of fresh grated ginger with equal parts of sesame or olive oil. To treat an earache, put a few drops of the oil on a piece of cotton and insert into the ear.

Research has shown ginger root has the same effects whether fresh or dried. The plant can be taken confidently in large quantities because the amount that must be taken for a lethal dose is so incredibly high that the herb has been accepted as completely safe by the FDA. Ginger also enjoys a longer shelf life than most aromatic herbs because of its protective outer bark.


Excerpts from The How to Herb Book

Ginger, the spice used in cooking, is also used in the bathtub to promote perspiration to relieve congestion and fevers; and to help relax and relieve tired, achy muscles after over exercising: 3-4 tablespoons per full bathtub in tepid, no hot water.

  • Is great in cough syrups and helps relieve congestion in the sinus cavities especially when combined with Cayenne.
  • Has cleansing effect on the kidneys and bowels.
  • Helps to remove excess toxins from the body.
  • Stimulates the circulatory system.
  • Helps with suppressed menstruation and is excellent for menstrual cramps.

Excerpt from Nutritional Herbology

The Chinese value ginger as a stimulating diaphoretic, and always add ginger to meat dishes to detoxify the meat. They use ginger externally to remove the heat of painful, inflamed and stiff joints. An oil extract of ginger is used in massage therapy for the treatment of dandruff and for earaches.

A favorite personal use of ginger is to place 2-3 tablespoonfuls in a hot tub of water. This really relaxes my muscles and relieves body pain. It helps if you place the powdered ginger in a large tea bag so you do not have floaties in the bath with you.

The volatile oils, oleo resins and proteolytic enzymes in ginger are digestive stimulants which trigger the production of digestive fluids. This helps combat the effects of overeating, improper chewing or excessive motion by helping to make the digestive process more efficient, increasing gastric motility and neutralizing toxins and acids in the digestive tract. This carminative action has been widely recognized for centuries and is the basis for most of its medicinal use.

The volatile oils are also stimulants that produce effects on the circulatory system, including diaphoretic action and vasomotor stimulus. The folk use of ginger in rheumatism remedies apparently has some basis as ginger is hypocholesterolemic, both to serum cholesterol and cholesterol stored in the liver. This makes ginger a blood purifier in folk terms. This may also help rid the body of other toxins that contribute to the inflammatory diseases.

The fresh juice of ginger has the ability to reduce serum glucose levels in test animals and may have use as a hypoglycemic agent, although its mode of action is obscure.

Ginger has a longer shelf life than most aromatic herbs because of its protective root bark.


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From Our Reading and/or Experience...

  • This is not like the Ginger you may find on a spice rack in a supermarket. This is much fresher and more effective.
  • Like most spices, it is potent and a little goes a long way. Nonetheless, we do go wild with it. This is one of our preferred spices because after reading all that it’s good for, we have learned to love it.
  • We use it very often in tea and tincture combinations. Of course, it can be used in many other types of remedies. For instance, it can easily be made into powder, and used as such in capsules.
  • Ginger is a food and spice. Thus, we keep it in the kitchen as all other food ingredients. We add it to many dishes (salads, meat dishes, deserts, stir fry, vegetables, etc.) to enhance the flavor and add nutritional value to our foods.
  • Ginger can be used to benefit anyone: men, women (including before, during or after pregnancy, and nursing), children and animals.
  • It can be used as often as you would like, and in any way you choose.
  • As is the case with most spices, Ginger should be stored in a dark, dry, and cool place.

Customer Reviews

Please, take a moment and comment on this product.

Is the ginger raw?
by April on Aug 25, 2013

How is the ginger processed? Is it raw? Is the garlic powder raw?

    Re: Is the ginger raw?
    by Bulk Herb Store on Aug 29, 2013

    Yes, this ginger is dried raw in a herb drying room. The garlic powder is also dried raw the powdered.

Stops motion sickness
by Annette on Feb 18, 2010

I started using ginger capsules for motion sickness on the advice of my mother. Dramamine, the OTC drug of choice for this problem, made me so sleepy and loopy-feeling that I was no good for about a day after taking it. That is not a problem with ginger. I take two caps about 30 minutes before getting on an airplane (or going on a car trip when curvy roads are involved), and usually another 2 to 4 sometime during the trip. (Ginger is best taken with food unless you donít mind a little hot feeling in your stomach.) This has been a wonderful remedy for me because the Dramamine used to cost me a whole day of visiting time with my daughterís family.



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