Nettle Leaf - Cut, Organic

Herbs: Nettle Leaf - Cut, Organically Grown

Common Names : Nettle, stinging nettle, common nettle
Latin Name: Urtica dioica
Origin: USA/Bulgaria

Excerpts from Nutritional Herbology

Extracts of nettle have been included in hair tonics for centuries due to its purported ability to stimulate hair growth. Like many bitter herbs, nettle is a blood purifier. Its long list of traditional uses can be summed up in its ability to increase the production of urine, its mild laxative effect and its ability to increase the efficiency of liver and kidney function.


Excerpts from Practical Herbalism

It is one of the wild plants still gathered each spring in rural regions as a "spring tonic" and pot-herb. It makes a healthy and very nutritious vegetable, which is cleansing and easy to digest. An old country remedy for chronic rheumatism and arthritis is "Urtication" or flogging with nettles. Some folks even keep a nettle plant growing on a sunny windowsill, so that the healing stings might be applied throughout the winter.

It is a strange fact that the juice of the nettle proves an antidote for its own sting, and being applied will afford instant relief. The sting of a nettle may also be cured by rubbing the part with dock, Rosemary, Peppermint or Sage leaves, as well as those of Comfrey, plantain, or jewelweed, which can often be found growing alongside nettles.

Primary Constituents:

Chlorophyll, in high yields... Nettles are a significant source of vitamin C and vitamin A, bio-available minerals, including calcium, silicon, and potassium chloride; protein, and dietary fiber.


From Our Reading and/or Experience...

  • We use it very often in tea and tincture combinations. Of course, it can be used in many other types of remedies. It's one of our favorite flavors in teas.
  • Nettle is a food. Thus, we keep it in the kitchen as all other food ingredients. We add it in small amounts to many dishes (salads, meat dishes, stir fry, vegetables, etc.) to add nutritional value to our foods.
  • Nettle can be used to benefit anyone: men, women (including before, during or after pregnancy, and nursing), children and animals.
  • It can be used as often as you would like, and in any way you choose.
  • As is the case with most herbs, Nettle should be stored in a dark, dry, and cool place.

Customer Reviews

Please, take a moment and comment on this product.

Nettle for Allergies
by Kim on Sep 21, 2012

While in college two year ago, one of my roommates had cats. I love cats, but, in addition to many things, I am mildly allergic to them. After a week of not being able to breath through my nose, watery eyes, and a raw throat I was pretty desperate for relief...especially since Benadryl didn't seem to be helping. Luckily, I stumbled across a local herb store where the owner recommended I take Nettle Tincture. WHAT RELIEF! Now I can enjoy the outdoors without a sniffle and pet cats again! Not only have I taken it religiously ever since, I've also recommended it to everyone I know that has allergies. My professors, roommates, and now, my husband (newly wed!) have all benefited. I'm now making my own tincture for my family!

Asthma
by Adrienne on May 11, 2010

I have a friend who has severe asthma. She uses her inhaler several times per day and still has trouble breathing. After reading in one of my herbal books that nettle can help people with asthma, I gave her some dried herb tea just to see if it would help. Her labored breathing stopped after about 15 minutes, so I sent the rest of the nettle home with her to try. She drank the tea throughout the day (like iced tea), and didn't use her inhaler once. She said she felt so much better- and the best part is that the tea is non-caffeinated, so she never got jittery! I had always used nettle for pregnancy, because I tend to get anemic- I had no idea that it could help an asthmatic so dramatically. This is amazing stuff.

For His Sake, Adrienne.

I had no idea of the true healing power.
by S. C . on May 29, 2009

My dad is a type two diabetic. With this he has also been diagnosed with neuropathy. His nerve endings "died" and according to his Dr. was going to have to have fingers, toes, and eventually feet and hands amputated as they died. We were out harvesting stinging nettles for tea a few years ago, when he decided he was going to pick them for me so I didn't have to wear
gloves he could just do it himself. He picked for 45mins. When he started
to get feeling back in his hands. He was so joyous not have had feeling at all for three years in his hands or feet. He proceeded to take his shoes off and walk all over the nettle plants until he started 'feeling' the burn. Praise the Lord! I knew it was good for diebetics as a tea I had no idea of
the true healing power. God is so awesome. Blessings, S. C