Peppermint Leaf - Cut

Herbs: Peppermint Leaf - Cut

Common Names: Peppermint, balm mint, brandy mint
Latin Name: Mentha piperita
Origin: USA

Excerpts from The How to Herb Book

Peppermint is a delicious mild tea. It is wonderful to use as a beverage – hot in the winter and cold in the summer. Dieters, it contains no calories.

  • One of the oldest and most popular remedies for simple colic and minor bloat in children and adults.
  • Good for all digestive problems, helps stomach pain caused by indigestion and is soothing to the stomach.
  • Expels stomach and colon gas.
  • Excellent for fevers, flu, diarrhea, ulcers, and colitis.
  • Strengthens nerves and heart muscles.
  • Cleanses and tones the body.
  • Can take the place of coffee for a stimulant.
  • Promotes relaxation.


Excerpts from Nutritional Herbology

The popularity of peppermint is based on its volatile oil, which contains an abundance of menthol, a time-honored and clinically proven aid to digestion. Menthol is also a mild antispasmodic which makes it useful for relieving menstrual cramps and nausea. It is also a mild vasodilator, creating a warm or flushed feeling by stimulating circulation.

Peppermint oil is used in the food industry for flavoring. The herb and oil is used in the culinary arts because of its stimulating, stomachic and carminative properties. In medicine, peppermint has been useful as an antispasmodic, expectorant and irritant. It is used in alleviating the symptoms of colds, flu, and general fevers, nervous disorders, flatulent colic, rheumatism, as a local anesthetic and to cover the taste or quality of the nauseating or griping effects of other medicines.

Peppermint is high or very high on the following nutrients:

  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Magnesium
  • Niacin
  • Phosphorus
  • Potassium
  • Protein
  • Riboflavin
  • Thiamine
  • Vitamin A

  • Excerpts from Practical Herbalism

    The mints are amongst the oldest and most reliable of herbal remedies, especially for issues relating to digestion. Culpeper quotes an even more ancient herbal authority, Simeon Sethi, and says, “It helps a cold liver, strengthens the belly, causes digestion, stays vomit, and hiccough. It is good against the gnawing of the heart, provokes the appetite, takes away obstructions of the liver, and stirs up bodily lust.” Apart from that last commendation, most modern herbals recite virtually the same litany. Ellingwood considered it specific for flatulent colic, gastrodynia, nausea, vomiting, spasmodic pain in the bowels, hiccups, palpitation from indigestion, griping, irritability of the stomach, diarrhea with abdominal pain, and nervous headache. In addition, he recommends it for the following pathologies: fevers associated with nausea and vomiting, local pain relief in rheumatism (as the oil), symptomatic relief of asthma and chronic bronchitis, toothache, acute indigestion, painful gonorrhea, and pruritis ani. The essential oil, distilled from the fresh cut plant, has enjoyed a wide range of medicinal and culinary uses since the 18th century, and is one of the few that are safe to take internally or apply to the skin undiluted.

    Special Considerations:

    Like Ginger and Capsicum, peppermint is a helpful herb “catalyst” or activator; drinking a cup of Peppermint tea before taking other herbs opens the circulation, and potentiates their action. It also helps make the disagreeable taste of many herbal formulas a little more palatable.

    Notes:

    A few sprigs of peppermint placed in picnic baskets or food cabinets makes an effective deterrent to ants.


    From Our Reading and/or Experience...

    • We use Peppermint more than any other herb in our teas. Of course, it can be used in many other types of remedies. It can easily be ground up, and used in capsules.
    • Peppermint is a food. Thus, we keep it in the kitchen as all other food ingredients. We add it to many dishes (salads, meat dishes, stir fry, vegetables, etc.) to enhance the flavor and add nutritional value to our foods. Most of the times, we add it after the dish is prepared.
    • It can be used to benefit anyone: men, women (including before, during or after pregnancy, and nursing), children and animals.
    • It can be used as often as you would like, and in any way you choose.
    • As is the case with most herbs, Peppermint should be stored in a dark, dry, and cool place.

    Customer Reviews

    Please, take a moment and comment on this product.

    peppermint during nursing
    by joanne on Aug 10, 2013

    I read somewhere that peppermint is hard on your milk supply during nursing. What is your opinion on this?

      Re: peppermint during nursing
      by Bulk Herb Store on Aug 13, 2013

      Hello,
      Drinking Peppermint Tea while nursing is safe in moderation. One to two cups a day would be fine!



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    I have made multiple orders from y'all and am very pleased with each one! The one cabinet shelf I was keeping all my herbs on is overflowing! And the best thing is that I use most of them daily! (The others I use at least once a week! :]) ~Emily Dawn P.

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