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How-To


Make a Salve

Salves/ointments are generally antiseptic and bring healing to scrapes, cuts or burns by forming a protective layer over them.

1. Fill glass jar 1/3 full of herbs and cover with coconut oil or your oil of choice. Screw on lid and place jar on top of a dishtowel in a crock pot. Fill the crock pot with water (but not above the jar’s lid) and turn on warm for three days.

2. Check the water level everyday to make sure the water hasn’t evaporated, and fill as needed. NEVER pour cold water over a hot glass jar.

3. After three days, strain the herbs off of the oil (while warm).

4. Melt a 1/2 cup (approximately 2 oz. of grated beeswax for 8 to 9 oz. of infused oil) of beeswax in a saucepan on low heat and add oil. Remove from heat and stir until completely melted. Add a drop of vitamin E oil or Grapeseed oil for every ounce of oil. This is a natural preservative.

5. Pour into metal tins and let sit over night or carefully place in refrigerator to cool and harden.

Tips:
~ If it is too soft for you, reheat it and add a bit more beeswax. If it is too hard reheat it and add a touch more oil.
~ Salve is a thick oil that is used for, cuts, bites, burns, rashes, boils, massage, and more. Salves can keep up to five years or more.
~ Keep out of light and extreme heat.

The following books have been our best references on making our own salves and ointments at home:

* Herbal Antibiotics
* Practical Herbalism
* The How to Herb Book


From our Mailbox

KUDOS to your shipping department... because it was pouring rain the day that it arrived and the UPS guy left it at the end of the driveway (we have a gate to keep the animals out of the orchard). It was in a plastic bag, but the box was still SOAKING wet. We looked at it and thought, "Well, whatever is inside is going to be completely destroyed." We peeled the box off (yes, peeled!) and you know what? Your shipping department did such a great job packaging everything that everything was completely dry. Even the book was perfectly intact. Yay! =)


Did You Know?

Cayenne powder has been used by researchers in Antarctica to help them bear the extremely cold temperatures. The cayenne powder is sprinkled into their boots before putting them on. As the powder slowly comes in contact with the skin through the socks, it will draw blood to the feet, thus bringing much needed warms to the extremities. The one draw back is the red powder stains light colored socks. From our readings, it seems the stained socks were a small price to pay for the great benefit of being able to feel your toes after a little while out in the blistering cold! After trying this on a number of occasions during the winter near Lake Superior, I'm also convinced the stained socks are worth it.