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Another Remedy for MRSA Boils

by Linda

June 2010

When I had MRSA, I thought I had been bitten by a black widow spider. Which was common for our area. When it began to spread I knew something wasn't right. By the time I went to the doctor I had nine boils. The dr. gave me a sulfer drug which only made the 2 smallest ones go away. A lot of research led me to garlic. I placed four med./ large cloves in 6 oz. of water and let that sit for 2 hours. (this water can be kept for 28 days) The water ( shaken first) then went onto a cotton ball and was taped to the boil for 2 hours. (Anything longer and it burned my skin) The wound was then rubbed with Tea Tree oil and neosporin and covered with gauze. (To prevent more spreading) I did this 3 times a day. I also began to drink a broth of beef boullion, fresh garlic, dandelion, oregano, comfrey, white willow and cayenne pepper. (Plus some other spices to make it taste good) After months of pain the cores began to come out and the boils began to heal! In the end I had 14 boils and fought this for 4 months! The last boil that popped up lasted only 1 week! I also treated my nose with a couple drops of tea tree oil in 2 oz. of olive oil. Dip a cotton swab in the mixture then rub the insides of both nostrils. (use a new swab for each) I have not had another outbreak since March 2009! I thank God for that!

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Did You Know?

Cayenne powder has been used by researchers in Antarctica to help them bear the extremely cold temperatures. The cayenne powder is sprinkled into their boots before putting them on. As the powder slowly comes in contact with the skin through the socks, it will draw blood to the feet, thus bringing much needed warms to the extremities. The one draw back is the red powder stains light colored socks. From our readings, it seems the stained socks were a small price to pay for the great benefit of being able to feel your toes after a little while out in the blistering cold! After trying this on a number of occasions during the winter near Lake Superior, I'm also convinced the stained socks are worth it.