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Cold/Flu and Sore Throat? No Problem!

by Julie S.

October 2006

Whenever we get hit by a bad cold/flu with sore throat, blocked sinus and heavy head and chest, we make up this tea. My mum also used to make it for us as children. It is refreshing, clears the head, breaks up mucous, and we have found it to be very helpful. It doesn't stop the process of healing but gives more strength and speed to our God-given healing processes.

Crush 1 - 2 cloves of garlic into a large heat resistant cup. Add the juice of one freshly squeezed lemon (also some rind too, if it is clean and organic). Then, add 1/2 teaspoon of ground powdered Ginger. Then, a pinch of Cayenne pepper, and to top it off, a tablespoon of honey. Add a cup of hot water, just off the boil, and drink the whole lot as soon as it is bearably cool enough. Within 20 minutes, go to bed and cover up. Let your body do the rest.

Often though, we make this up in a big glass jug, (multiply the ingredients accordingly and to taste) using chopped fresh garlic, and thinly sliced fresh ginger, plus the other ingredients, which settles and steeps on the bottom. We put the jug beside the bed and after sipping about 3 glasses while it is still hot/warm, it does wonders and is very soothing.

We have made it up and put it in a thermos flask too. This keeps it hot for whenever you want to drink it to relieve your symptoms.

If the kids ever have a bad chesty cough, we mix 1/2 lemon juice, with 1/4 teaspoon powdered Ginger, pinch of Cayenne (can be omitted if your child won't drink it) and honey to sweeten. Add very warm water to half a cup, and get them to drink it as needed. We have found this syrupy mix works well and the kids ask for it.

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Did You Know?

Cayenne powder has been used by researchers in Antarctica to help them bear the extremely cold temperatures. The cayenne powder is sprinkled into their boots before putting them on. As the powder slowly comes in contact with the skin through the socks, it will draw blood to the feet, thus bringing much needed warms to the extremities. The one draw back is the red powder stains light colored socks. From our readings, it seems the stained socks were a small price to pay for the great benefit of being able to feel your toes after a little while out in the blistering cold! After trying this on a number of occasions during the winter near Lake Superior, I'm also convinced the stained socks are worth it.