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Relieve Bug and Chigger Bites

by Leah

October 2009

We use plantain leaves straight out of the yard for bug bites and infected wounds. We bring it inside, rinse it off, roll it up and mash it a little to get it juicy. Then we apply it directly to the area and hold it on there with a bandaid. We usually do this at night and by morning the redness and puss is gone. Sometimes we do it during the day for wasp or bee stings that need immediate attention. If you have a very itchy bite that does not stop itching after the plantain treatment then it is probably a chigger.

For chiggers, my sister uses nail polish. My husband uses rubbing alcohol. I prefer a small drop of tea tree oil. It works great! Just apply it directly to the bump. It may itch a little bit for a minute or two but it will gradually ease up and by the next day it will be gone. If you have multiple bites over a large area you may want to dilute with water and then apply it.

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Did You Know?

Cayenne powder has been used by researchers in Antarctica to help them bear the extremely cold temperatures. The cayenne powder is sprinkled into their boots before putting them on. As the powder slowly comes in contact with the skin through the socks, it will draw blood to the feet, thus bringing much needed warms to the extremities. The one draw back is the red powder stains light colored socks. From our readings, it seems the stained socks were a small price to pay for the great benefit of being able to feel your toes after a little while out in the blistering cold! After trying this on a number of occasions during the winter near Lake Superior, I'm also convinced the stained socks are worth it.