Catnip Herb C/S, Organic, 1/2 lb.

(CLC-2)
Nepeta cataria  |  Origin: United States
$10.25
In stock

USDA Organic

Aptly named for its ability to make felines go crazy, Catnip produces the opposite effect when taken internally. Catnip is most commonly used for its calming effect on children.

Many parents have found this soothing, gentle herb beneficial for their children. It includes herbal properties that may help reduce fever, calm upset stomachs, and support a good night’s sleep.


Common Names: Catnip, nep, catmint, cat's wort

Catnip Herb is one of the traditional cold and flu remedies. It is an excellent diaphoretic, and its ability to induce sleep while producing perspiration without increasing the heat of the system makes catnip herb a valuable drink in any case of fever. Owing to its gentle nature, catnip herb is highly prized in the treatment of children's ailments.

Excerpts from The ABC Herbal
Catnip Herb is another aromatic which many parents have found beneficial for their children. It also stimulates the body, settles the stomach and soothes the nerves. One famous herbal team is the combination of catnip with fennel, which has long been used as a remedy for colic, gas, and indigestion in children.

Excerpts from The How to Herb Book

  • A common ditch bank weed loved by cats.
  • Used effectively for fevers and to alleviate the symptoms of childhood diseases.
  • Good for stomach gas or cramps, aids in digestion.
  • Used for babies and young children for colic, stomach pains, teething and fevers. Helps clean out mucus in the body.
  • Used in enemas to bring down fever, eliminate mucus, relax the colon and ease colon cramping. Catnip enemas also help relieve the aches of flu.

Excerpts from Practical Herbalism
Catnip is one of the traditional cold and flu remedies. It is an excellent diaphoretic, and its ability to induce sleep while producing perspiration without increasing the heat of the system makes it a valuable drink in every case of fever.

As a carminative with antispasmodic properties, the herb also eases any stomach upsets, dyspepsia, flatulence, and colic. Its sedative action on the nerves adds to its generally relaxing properties.

Catnip is one of the most popular herbs in stress formulas where it is included for its sedative effect. Perhaps the most popular use of catnip is as an herbal tea consumed just before bedtime. It has a very long list of folk uses which is understandable since it is often difficult to get a good night's sleep in today's fast paced world.

Contains aromatic compounds that have a sedative effect, relieve smooth muscle spasms and induce sweating.

From Our Reading and/or Experience...

  • We use catnip often in tea and tincture combinations pertaining to any digestive, nervous or sleeping issues. Of course, it can be used in many other types of remedies. For instance, it can easily be made into powder, and used as such in capsules.
  • It can be used to benefit anyone: men, women (including before, during or after pregnancy, and nursing), children and animals.
  • It can be used as often as you would like, and in any way you choose.
  • As is the case with most herbs, catnip should be stored in a dark, dry, and cool place. Refrigeration or freezing is great, but certainly not necessary. Following these suggestions will delay the loss of its highly valued nutritional and medicinal properties.
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  • Nervine Tincture Recipe

    A great combination of herbs to help you relax and unwind at the end of a long day.


    WHAT YOU'LL NEED


    HOW TO MAKE IT...

    Mix all the dried herbs and place in a clean quart jar, then pour 2/3 cup of boiling water over them. Allow to soak for a few minutes. Fill the jar to within 1/2 inch of the top with Glycerine and put a cap on the jar. Place jar in a crock-pot full of water and turn it on low. I keep it “cooking” (not boiling) for 3 days, stirring once everyday. The glycerine will turn golden brown and have a strong plant smell. On the third day, strain the warm liquid through a cheese cloth and squeeze all the liquid out of the cooked herbs. The liquid is the tincture; the pulp can be discarded. Keep the tincture in a glass jar in a cool, dark place, and it will keep for months or even years. I fill small brown glass dropper bottles with my herbal tinctures and label them, including dates.