Nettle Leaf C/S, Organic, 1/2 lb.

(NLC-2)
Urtica dioica  |  Origin: United States
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Special Price $5.95 Regular Price $8.50
In stock

USDA Organic

Nettle grows wild in many parts of the world, and the fresh leaves are often used in salads and other dishes for added health benefits. Its leaves, before picking, are covered with fine stinging hairs to protect the plant in its natural habitat.

This nutrient rich herb is a significant source of vitamin C, vitamin A, calcium, silicon, potassium chloride, chlorophyll, protein, and dietary fiber. The vitamin content may help support vibrant skin, hair, nails, and a healthy liver, kidneys and respiratory system.


Common Names : Nettle, stinging nettle, common nettle

Excerpts from Nutritional Herbology
Extracts of nettle have been included in hair tonics for centuries due to its purported ability to stimulate hair growth. Like many bitter herbs, nettle is a blood purifier. Its long list of traditional uses can be summed up in its ability to increase the production of urine, its mild laxative effect and its ability to increase the efficiency of liver and kidney function.

Excerpts from Practical Herbalism
It is one of the wild plants still gathered each spring in rural regions as a "spring tonic" and pot-herb. It makes a healthy and very nutritious vegetable, which is cleansing and easy to digest. An old country remedy for chronic rheumatism and arthritis is "Urtication" or flogging with nettles. Some folks even keep a nettle plant growing on a sunny windowsill, so that the healing stings might be applied throughout the winter.

It is a strange fact that the juice of the nettle proves an antidote for its own sting, and being applied will afford instant relief. The sting of a nettle may also be cured by rubbing the part with Dock, Rosemary, Peppermint or Sage leaves, as well as those of Comfrey, Plantain, or jewelweed, which can often be found growing alongside nettles.

Primary Constituents:
Chlorophyll, in high yields... Nettles are a significant source of vitamin C and vitamin A, bio-available minerals, including calcium, silicon, and potassium chloride; protein, and dietary fiber.

From Our Reading and/or Experience...

  • We use it very often in tea and tincture combinations. Of course, it can be used in many other types of remedies. It's one of our favorite flavors in teas.
  • Nettle is a food. Thus, we keep it in the kitchen as all other food ingredients. We add it in small amounts to many dishes (salads, meat dishes, stir fry, vegetables, etc.) to add nutritional value to our foods.
  • Nettle can be used to benefit anyone: men, women (including before, during or after pregnancy, and nursing), children and animals.
  • It can be used as often as you would like, and in any way you choose.
  • As is the case with most herbs, Nettle should be stored in a dark, dry, and cool place.
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